Photo Story Idea: Catherine Jackson

My idea for my photo story is to focus on the Humane society specifically a married couple who are also political science professors here at Georgia Southern University who work with the Statesboro Humane Society.  Debra Sebia and Dr. Vincent Kohler foster animals (mainly dogs)  from the humane society and prepare them for adoption sometimes adopting the animals themselves.  I want to highlight their work with the Humane Society and focus on what their relationship is with them. How do they handle things monetarily? What got Deb and Vince interested in fostering animals? Do they keep tab on the animals they foster that are adopted? Or any other topics they feel should be focused on surrounding them and the Statesboro Humane Society.

Advertisements

My idea might not but in the right ballpark. I was thinking about doing my photo story about my best friends wedding. The wedding is March 23rd and I will be there the whole weekend and will be able to photograph everything I would need.

Dave LaBelle: On Storytelling

We watched this video in class, but I wanted to post it in case you wanted to watch it again.

Again, listen carefully as Dave explains how he discovers what he needs to shoot in order to tell someone’s story. Essentially, by talking to your subjects and getting to know them, they will lead you to where the pictures are. And understand the importance of projection. The best journalists, regardless of the medium they work in, learn how to put themselves in another’s shoes in order to tell their stories. And learn the importance of trust. You will never scratch below the surface and be able to move your audience without the trust of your subjects.

 

I’m including a BONUS video! In the first video, Dave tells us about working with a student during a workshop on a story about a woman caring for her 97-year-old father. In this video, we get to hear an actual conversation between Dave and the student, specifically talking about how to approach the story, the student’s concerns, and Dave’s advice. It’s like being in the huddle with a master coach, and it offers some keen insight into the thought process and problem solving while shooting picture stories. It’s a little longer, but I highly recommend you find a little time to view it. Great advice on shooting and what to look for. Great advice on editing. Just great advice …

 

Make an investment in your subject. Every picture (in a story) is like a word in a sentence. And never forget this: The secret to great storytelling is to get out of the way!

Follow up on class (2/20) – Quiz and Picture stories!

Don’t forget about the quiz next week. Start reviewing the handouts cited in the study sheet. You can view and download the study sheet here:

Quiz 1 study sheet

And review the class presentation on working angles and perspectives, as there was no handout but there are a couple of important concepts you need to remember:

Presentation-Perspectives_Portraits

Again, make sure your read the chapter in your textbook on “The Photo Story.”

There are good discussions on the topic and lots of things to consider as you brainstorm story ideas. There are also some really good examples of stories.

If you need to view and download the handouts from class, here are the links:

A4.Picture Story Proposal

Picture Stories (overview)

Tips for shooting and editing photo stories

And here’s the presentation from class for review and downloading: Presentation_PictureStories

 

For further reading, try this article: The Art & Craft Of Modern Storytelling – How to make a compelling photo essay in the Internet age.

Looking for some inspiration as you brainstorm ideas? Look at what others have done. Like I said, sometimes simple ideas can turn into a story with universal appeal. Here’s an example from Nancy Andrews from the Washington Post, who spent weeks with a single dad for a picture story which ran on Fathers Day: Fathers Day.

Try viewing the website for Western Kentucky University’s Mountain Workshop. This is one of the premiere and best-known workshops for photojournalism students and young professionals, so you’ll get to see what can happen when your college peers fan out and visually document a community over a long weekend. Of course, this project involves total emersion into the projects, but there’s no reason why you can’t produce some similar results by spending a couple of hours per week (or so) with your subjects. There are over 50 stories from last year’s workshop alone, linked right on the homepage, you can look at for inspiration.

The University of Missouri has a similar Photo Workshop. Perhaps look there, as well, for some inspiration.

If you want to see examples of some of the best work in the world, perhaps check out the links to the Pictures of the Year International, Best of Photojournalism, and World Press Photo contests linked on the side bar under the Photojournalism Sites header. Many of the winning stories are made overseas, but don’t let that discourage you. Some of the topics can be universal in nature, regardless of where the pictures were made. And some of the winners are made in small communities right here in the U.S. The main thing is to draw inspiration to find interesting subjects and see how picture stories are constructed.

I’m not going to direct you much as you work on these stories, as we have a lot of subject matter to cover during class time. Plus, I’ve found the best way to learn how to shoot picture stories is by doing it. That’s why we start early – if you mess up or miss something, you will likely have a chance to return to your subject and keep trying until you capture something that will round your stories out.

Use the materials I’ve given you to help you plan and edit. And I highly encourage you share some of your results along the way – both with me and the class right on the website. And you can always contact me for advice and feedback along the way.

Don’t be intimidated in any way. I’m not looking for expansive, epic stories of great social consequence. Remember: 5-10 photographs are what you are shooting for. The main thing is to spend some time with your subjects and learn the process of creating a visual narrative.

I’m looking forward to seeing your ideas start to roll in!

More to come …

Feature Photography – Marla Rooker

27 year old Blockbuster LLC employee Kenneth Hunter contemplates the idea that blockbuster is now becoming ancient history knowing that his store in Statesboro, Georgia is the only one remaining in the state after the companies decision to close 300 stores nationwide.

27 year old Blockbuster LLC employee Kenneth Hunter contemplates the idea that blockbuster is now becoming ancient history on Tuesday, February 19th knowing that his store in Statesboro, Georgia is the only one remaining in the state after the companies decision to close 300 stores nationwide.

Georgia Southern University President Brooks Keel joined the Bulloch County Historical Society for their revealing ceremony of the new sign that commemorates the founding of the university in 1906.
GRADE ME Georgia Southern University President Brooks Keel joined the Bulloch County Historical Society on Monday, February 18th for their revealing ceremony of the new sign that commemorates the founding of the university in 1906.

FEATURES

GRADE: Leasing Agent at The Cove Apartment Complex, Jauvontei Jammison, 20, from Gwinnett County works to pay for her college education.

GRADE: Leasing Agent at The Cove Apartment Complex, Jauvontei Jammison, 20, from Gwinnett County works to pay for her college education.

Georgia Southern University friends, Dillion Marry, 19 (left), Spencer Flaim, 21(center) and DJ Cistolo, 22 (Right) dress up to participate in the Harlem Shake dance at Sweetheart Circle.

Georgia Southern University friends, Dillion Marry, 19 (left), Spencer Flaim, 21(center) and DJ Cistolo, 22 (Right) dress up to participate in the Harlem Shake dance at Sweetheart Circle.

Georgia Southern University Psychology Grad Student Keturah Hollowell, 24, Marietta Ga, Playing with the Georgia Southern Marching Band for the Basketball game in Statesboro Ga, on February 18,2013.

Georgia Southern University Psychology Grad Student Keturah Hollowell, 24, Marietta Ga, Playing with the Georgia Southern Marching Band for the Basketball game in Statesboro Ga, on February 18,2013.

Good Will job coach, Marisela Hernandez, 22, Claxton High School 2009.

Good Will job coach, Marisela Hernandez, 22, Claxton High School 2009.